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Table 1.

Sample composition and size

Species nameMass (g)1Number of individualsSubstrate2Number of ambles3
Microcebus murinus 61 Pole 22 
Mirza coquereli 315 Pole 88 
Cheirogaleus medius 282 Pole 73 
Loris tardigradus 266 Pole 10 
Callithrix jacchus 320 Pole 56 
Saguinus fuscicollis 350 Pole 25 
Ateles geoffroyi 7500 Pole 
Macaca fascicularis 6546 Pole 19 
Macaca mulatta 4475 Ground 61 
Chlorocebus aethiops 3575 Ground 21 
Erythrocebus patas 8185 Ground 18 
Papio anubis 19 200 Ground 24 
Species nameMass (g)1Number of individualsSubstrate2Number of ambles3
Microcebus murinus 61 Pole 22 
Mirza coquereli 315 Pole 88 
Cheirogaleus medius 282 Pole 73 
Loris tardigradus 266 Pole 10 
Callithrix jacchus 320 Pole 56 
Saguinus fuscicollis 350 Pole 25 
Ateles geoffroyi 7500 Pole 
Macaca fascicularis 6546 Pole 19 
Macaca mulatta 4475 Ground 61 
Chlorocebus aethiops 3575 Ground 21 
Erythrocebus patas 8185 Ground 18 
Papio anubis 19 200 Ground 24 

All individuals are adult animals.

1

Average species body mass for maies and females combined(Fleagle, 1999).

2

`Substrate' refers to the specific substrate considered for each primate species during the second phase of this study (see text for details). During the first phase, data were collected on a variety of pole sizes (for details,see Schmitt, 2003a; Schmitt, 2003b; Schmitt and Lemelin, 2002; Schmitt and Lemelin, 2004; Lemelin and Schmitt, 2004) and the ground - with the exception of the slender loris (Loris tradigradus), which never walked on the ground.

3

The absolute number of ambles observed during the first phase of this study involving a search of 1800 min of video in which only ambles were noted. These values are recorded and presented to examine whether ambles are common in all primates. The relatively frequency of ambles and other gaits is displayed in Table 2.

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