1-20 of 24
Keywords: swimbladder
Close
Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2020) 223 (17): jeb219808.
Published: 1 September 2020
... Anguillicoloides crassus . Infection primarily affects the swimbladder, a gas-filled organ that enables the eel to control its depth in the water. A reduction in swimbladder function may be fatal for eel undergoing their spawning migration to the Sargasso Sea, a journey of over 5000 km. Although the physiological...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2018) 221 (1): jeb168948.
Published: 10 January 2018
... communication Swimbladder Triggerfishes (Balistidae) are commonly found in shallow tropical waters ( Berry and Baldwin, 1966 ; Chen et al., 2001 ; Fish, 1948 ; Lobel and Johanne, 1980 ). They are known to produce sounds during agonistic interactions or when a fish is chased into a narrow hole...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2017) 220 (2): 186–193.
Published: 15 January 2017
..., including teeth stridulation, collision of the buccal teeth and movements of the fins. The best-supported hypothesis involves movements of the pectoral fin against the lateral part of the swimbladder, called a drumming membrane. In this study, we describe for the first time the sounds made by the blackbar...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2012) 215 (13): 2192–2202.
Published: 1 July 2012
... radiation? Here, a combination of different approaches has been used to determine the anatomical structure(s) responsible for the size-related variations observed in sound duration and frequency. Filling the swimbladder with physiological liquid specifically modified size-related acoustic features...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (21): 3613–3618.
Published: 1 November 2011
... are generated by rapid contractions of sonic muscles that insert on a broad tendon surrounding ventrally the cranial sac of the swimbladder. The piranha swimbladder is thought to play an important role in sound production as an impedance-matching device and as a resonator. However, the vibratory capacities...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (17): 2962–2972.
Published: 1 September 2011
...Matthew R. Stoyek; Frank M. Smith; Roger P. Croll SUMMARY Many teleosts use gas-filled swimbladders to control buoyancy and influence three-dimensional orientation (pitch and roll). However, swimbladder volume, and its contributions to these functions, varies with depth-related pressure according...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (16): 2702–2708.
Published: 15 August 2011
.... Pulsatile sounds are associated with dorsal elevation of the head, anterior extension of the ventral pectoral girdle and dorsal elevation of the caudal skeleton in Forcipiger flavissiumus . In Hemitaurichthys polylepis , extrinsic swimbladder muscles could be involved in sounds originating from...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (16): 2697–2701.
Published: 15 August 2011
...Eric Parmentier; Kenneth Mann; David Mann SUMMARY The air-filled swimbladder acts as an acoustic amplifier for some fish by converting sound pressure into particle motion, which is transmitted to the inner ear. Here, we describe in detail the specialized connection between the swimbladder and ear...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2010) 213 (20): 3536–3547.
Published: 15 October 2010
...Sheryl Coombs; Richard R. Fay; Andreas Elepfandt SUMMARY In goldfish and other otophysans, the Weberian ossicles mechanically link the saccule of the inner ear to the anterior swimbladder chamber (ASB). These structures are correlated with enhanced sound-pressure sensitivity and greater sensitivity...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2009) 212 (21): 3395–3402.
Published: 1 November 2009
... in the hypaxial musculature, ventro-laterally to the swimbladder. Contraction of these bundles should result in compression of the rib cage and also of the swimbladder, because of its close association with the serosa and ribs. Deflation of the swimbladder resulted in a reduced sound intensity. * Author...
Includes: Multimedia, Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2009) 212 (21): 3542–3552.
Published: 1 November 2009
...Michael L. Fine; Charles B. King; Timothy M. Cameron SUMMARY Both the swimbladder and sonic muscles of the oyster toadfish Opsanus tau (Linnaeus) increase in size with fish growth making it difficult to distinguish their relative contributions to sound production. We examined acoustics...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2009) 212 (9): 1377–1391.
Published: 1 May 2009
... five other toadfish species revealed that B. trispinosus hoots were distinct. Unlike any other reported fish, B. trispinosus had a bilaterally divided swimbladder, forming two separate swimbladders. Phylogenetic analysis suggested B. trispinosus was a relatively basal batrachoidid, and the swimbladder...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2007) 210 (9): 1641–1652.
Published: 1 May 2007
...Michael Berenbrink SUMMARY The ability of some fishes to inflate their compressible swimbladder with almost pure oxygen to maintain neutral buoyancy, even against the high hydrostatic pressure several thousand metres below the water surface, has fascinated physiologists for more than 200 years...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2006) 209 (15): 2952–2960.
Published: 1 August 2006
...Eric Parmentier; Jean-Paul Lagardère; Jean-Baptiste Braquegnier; Pierre Vandewalle; Michael L. Fine SUMMARY Fish sonic swimbladder muscles are the fastest muscles in vertebrates and have fibers with numerous biochemical and structural adaptations for speed. Carapid fishes produce sounds...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2005) 208 (7): 1363–1372.
Published: 1 April 2005
... that the otolithic organ adaptations for high-frequency hearing are already present in larval fish. Deflating the swimbladders in adult fish eliminated their response, which is consistent with sensing sound pressure. Deflating the swimbladder in larval fish did not affect their thresholds, which is consistent...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2004) 207 (10): 1643–1654.
Published: 15 April 2004
... between 100 Hz and 140 Hz,approximately half the fundamental frequency of a voluntarily calling fish. The muscle is capable of following electrical stimulation at frequencies of up to 360 Hz. Rapid damping and response over a wide frequency range indicate that the swimbladder is a highly damped, broadly...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2003) 206 (3): 469–475.
Published: 1 February 2003
... isoform) and vatB2 (brain isoform) —serve different functions. A localization of the two isoforms was attempted in swimbladder gas gland cells of the European eel Anguilla anguilla by immunohistochemistry. Two antibodies were produced by immunization of rabbits with synthetic peptides. Specificity...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2002) 205 (15): 2183–2188.
Published: 1 August 2002
... and swimbladder. Sounds produced by male weakfish occur at the time and location of spawning and have been observed in courtship in captivity. Each call includes a series of 6-10 sound pulses, and each pulse expresses a damped, 2-3 cycle acoustic waveform generated by single simultaneous twitches of the bilateral...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2002) 205 (8): 1069–1075.
Published: 15 April 2002
..., the effect of changes in pHe appeared to be more pronounced than at high pHe. Fig. 1. Changes in intracellular pH (pHi) at varied extracellular pH (pHe) in swimbladder gas gland cells. The values in parentheses are the number of cell cultures measured. Values are means ± S.E.M. Fig. 1. Changes...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2001) 204 (23): 4023–4029.
Published: 1 December 2001
...Caroline Prem; Bernd Pelster SUMMARY A cell culture system has been developed in which swimbladder gas gland cells from the European eel ( Anguilla anguilla ) were cultured on a permeable support. Cells seeded on Anodisc 13 (Whatman) or Costar Transwell 13 mm membranes form a confluent cell layer...