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Keywords: sea urchin
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J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (16): 2655–2659.
Published: 15 August 2011
..., high-current areas. † Author for correspondence ( Hannah.Stewart@dfo-mpo.gc.ca ) * Present address: West Vancouver Laboratory, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, 4160 Marine Drive, West Vancouver, BC V7V 1N6, Canada 9 5 2011 © 2011. 2011 sea urchin streamlining behaviour...
Includes: Multimedia, Supplementary data
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J Exp Biol (2007) 210 (3): 403–412.
Published: 1 February 2007
...Hideki Katow; Shunsuke Yaguchi; Keiichiro Kyozuka SUMMARY A full-length serotonin receptor mRNA from the 5Hthpr gene was sequenced from larvae of the sea urchin, Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus. The DNA sequence was most similar to 5HT-1A of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus found by The Sea...
Includes: Multimedia, Supplementary data
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J Exp Biol (2006) 209 (7): 1336–1343.
Published: 1 April 2006
...) of reactivated sea urchin sperm flagella. ATP concentration was 15 μmol l –1 . (A) Dark-field micrographs of symmetrical bending waves of the control sperm flagellum before UV irradiation. Beat frequency was 4.8 Hz. Bar, 10 μm. (B) Dark-field micrographs of `proximal region inhibition step 1'. Approximately 5 μm...
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J Exp Biol (2005) 208 (23): 4355–4361.
Published: 1 December 2005
... for correspondence (e-mail: aheyland@ufl.edu ) 8 9 2005 © The Company of Biologists Limited 2005 2005 thyroid hormone mollusc echinoderm iodine nuclear hormone receptor non-genomic action sea urchin Aplysia Many structurally similar signaling molecules are shared between...
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J Exp Biol (2005) 208 (13): 2555–2567.
Published: 1 July 2005
... -modulus of 6.0 and 8.1 kPa for sea stars and sea urchins, respectively), have viscoelastic properties and adapt their surface to the substratum profile. They also show increased adhesion on a rough substratum in comparison to its smooth counterpart, which is due mostly to an increase in the geometrical...
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J Exp Biol (2004) 207 (12): 2147–2155.
Published: 15 May 2004
...Lori A. Clow; David A. Raftos; Paul S. Gross; L. Courtney Smith SUMMARY The purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus expresses a homologue of complement component C3 (SpC3), which acts as a humoral opsonin. Significantly increased phagocytic activity was evident when yeast target cells were...
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J Exp Biol (2001) 204 (5): 823–834.
Published: 1 March 2001
...I. Yazaki ABSTRACT In sea urchin embryos, the first specification of cell fate occurs at the fourth cleavage, when small cells (the micromeres) are formed at the vegetal pole. The fate of other blastomeres is dependent on the receipt of cell signals originating from the micromeres. The micromeres...