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Keywords: homing
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Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2021) 224 (13): jeb238345.
Published: 8 July 2021
... obtain map information. Newts were displaced from breeding ponds without access to route-based cues to sites where they were held and/or tested under diffuse natural illumination. We found that: (1) newts held overnight at the testing site exhibited accurate homing orientation, but not if transported...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2020) 223 (14): jeb224618.
Published: 22 July 2020
...Rickesh N. Patel; Thomas W. Cronin ABSTRACT Mantis shrimp of the species Neogonodactylus oerstedii occupy small burrows in shallow waters throughout the Caribbean. These animals use path integration, a vector-based navigation strategy, to return to their homes while foraging. Here, we report...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2020) 223 (14): jeb218701.
Published: 15 July 2020
... in which they occur. Hence, the ant only needs to evaluate the instantaneous familiarity of the current view to obtain a heading direction. This study investigates whether ant homing behaviour is influenced by alterations in the sequence of views experienced along a familiar route, using the frequency...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2020) 223 (3): jeb210021.
Published: 3 February 2020
... modelling suggest that navigating ants might continuously integrate attractive and repellent visual memories. Visual navigation Ants Attractive and repellent memories Homing Route following Myrmecia croslandi Navigation on a local scale, in contrast to that on a global scale, involves...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
In collection:
Neuroethology
J Exp Biol (2018) 221 (20): jeb185306.
Published: 24 October 2018
... and away from the nest from different compass bearings. Learning walks Homing Visual navigation Ants Scene memories Ants, wasps and bees are central place foragers that always return to the nest after outbound journeys. In order to do this, a forager can employ path integration but must...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2018) 221 (2): jeb169714.
Published: 29 January 2018
... to widespread pools. Recent studies revealed their excellent spatial memory and the ability to home back from several hundred meters. It remains unclear whether this homing ability is restricted to the areas that had been previously explored or whether it allows the frogs to navigate from areas outside...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
In collection:
Neuroethology
J Exp Biol (2017) 220 (4): 634–644.
Published: 15 February 2017
... their body posture and in the closed-loop configuration to quickly rotate around their yaw axis with their own moment of inertia. In this account, we present the first evidence of naturalistic homing navigation on a spherical treadmill for two species of Cataglyphis desert ants. We were able to evaluate...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2015) 218 (11): 1715–1724.
Published: 1 June 2015
... ( Schippers et al., 2010 , 2006 ). In this study, however, we detected no difference in performance of precocious and normal foragers in a short-range homing task ( Table 2 ). This would imply that if a difference in flight performance between precocious and normal foragers exists, it is rather subtle...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2013) 216 (8): 1430–1433.
Published: 15 April 2013
...Gaia Dell'Ariccia; Francesco Bonadonna SUMMARY Olfactory cues have been shown to be important to homing petrels at night, but apparently those procellariiform species that also come back to the colony during the day are not impaired by smell deprivation. However, the nycthemeral distribution...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2012) 215 (16): 2751–2759.
Published: 15 August 2012
...Hiromichi Mitamura; Keiichi Uchida; Yoshinori Miyamoto; Toshiharu Kakihara; Aki Miyagi; Yuuki Kawabata; Kotaro Ichikawa; Nobuaki Arai SUMMARY Sedentary and territorial rockfish of the genus Sebastes exhibit distinctive homing ability and can travel back to an original location after displacements...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (14): 2375–2380.
Published: 15 July 2011
...Joaquin Ortega-Escobar SUMMARY Previous studies in the wolf spider Lycosa tarantula (Linnaeus 1758) have shown that homing is carried out by path integration and that, in the absence of information relative to the sun's position or any pattern of polarized light, L. tarantula obtains information...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2007) 210 (7): 1132–1138.
Published: 1 April 2007
...Anna Gagliardo; Paolo Ioalè; Maria Savini; Hans-Peter Lipp; Giacomo Dell'Omo Experiments have shown that homing pigeons are able to develop navigational abilities even if reared and kept confined in an aviary, provided that they are exposed to natural winds. These and other experiments performed...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2003) 206 (24): 4413–4423.
Published: 15 December 2003
... to their burrows throughout the foraging path and to minimize large body turns. We further examined the extent to which their body orientation during foraging (transverse body axis pointing more or less towards home) accurately represented their stored home vector. By examining sequences of fast escape, we have...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2003) 206 (24): 4425–4442.
Published: 15 December 2003
... to their burrows. We tested the spatial frame of reference(egocentric or exocentric), and the source of spatial information (idiothetic or allothetic) used during homing. We also tested which components of their locomotion they integrated (only voluntary, or voluntary plus reflexive). Fiddler crabs...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2003) 206 (20): 3719–3722.
Published: 15 October 2003
... at considerable depth and are not attracted to odour cues at sea. However, several procellariiform species have recently been shown to relocate their nesting burrows by scent, suggesting that these birds use an olfactory signature to identify the home burrow. We wanted to know whether diving petrels use smell...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2002) 205 (24): 3903–3914.
Published: 15 December 2002
...John B. Phillips; S. Chris Borland; Michael J. Freake; Jacques Brassart; Joseph L. Kirschvink SUMMARY Experiments were carried out to investigate the earlier prediction that prolonged exposure to long-wavelength (>500 nm) light would eliminate homing orientation by male Eastern red-spotted newts...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2002) 205 (16): 2519–2523.
Published: 15 August 2002
... with shamtreated control birds,we found that anosmia impaired nest recognition only in species that nest in burrows and that return home in darkness. Therefore, petrels showing nocturnal activity on land may rely on their sense of smell to find their burrows, while petrels showing diurnal activity or surface...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2001) 204 (24): 4177–4184.
Published: 15 December 2001
...Sonja Bisch-Knaden; Rüdiger Wehner SUMMARY Homing ants have been shown to associate directional information with familiar landmarks. The sight of these local cues might either directly guide the path of the ant or it might activate a landmark-based vector that points towards the goal position...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2001) 204 (12): 2063–2072.
Published: 15 June 2001
... of their return run, it was only during these parts that their path was oriented in the homeward direction. When, during the course of displacement experiments, the ants were deprived of their familiar skyline panorama, they moved in their home direction only for an extremely short distance (0.1–0.4m rather than...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1999) 202 (16): 2121–2126.
Published: 15 August 1999
...Hans G. Wallraff; Jackie Chappell; Tim Guilford ABSTRACT It seems reasonable to assume that pigeons use visual features in the landscape for orientation when they are homing over familiar terrain. Experimental evidence to prove or disprove this possibility is, however, difficult to obtain. Here, we...