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Keywords: goat
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Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (1): 104–112.
Published: 1 January 2011
... miniatures to draft breeds and an ontogenetic sample of goats and alpacas from infants to adults. In horses, CCD scales with body mass 0.19 and jaw length 0.57 , although in neither case is the correlation significant. In the ontogenetic samples of goats and alpacas, CCD is significantly correlated with body...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2008) 211 (7): 1148–1162.
Published: 1 April 2008
...Carlos A. Moreno; Russell P. Main; Andrew A. Biewener SUMMARY The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of non-steady locomotor activities on load predictability in two goat forelimb bones and to explore the degree to which bone curvature influences load predictability. We measured...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2005) 208 (24): 4599–4611.
Published: 15 December 2005
... follows small amounts of initial stretching. And in horses, while the vastus strain trajectory is complex, it is characterized mainly by shortening during stance. In this study, we use sonomicrometry and electromyography to study the vastus lateralis and biceps femoris of goats,with three goals in mind...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1996) 199 (8): 1667–1674.
Published: 1 August 1996
...Jean-Michel Weber; Gérard Brichon; Georges Zwingelstein; Grant Mcclelland; Christopher Saucedo; Ewald R. Weibel; C. Richard Taylor ABSTRACT This paper quantifies the fluxes of fatty acids through the pathways supplying muscle mitochondria with oxidative fuel in exercising dogs and goats. We used...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1996) 199 (8): 1659–1666.
Published: 1 August 1996
... % and 23 % of the carbohydrate oxidized at exercise intensities approaching in dogs and goats, respectively. Unexpectedly, maximal rates of circulating glucose oxidation were nearly the same in the two species (when expressed in absolute terms; dog:goat ratio = 1.2), despite the 2.2-fold difference...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1996) 199 (8): 1675–1688.
Published: 1 August 1996
... rates of oxygen and substrate transport measured in the same animals and reported in the preceding papers of this series. Dogs have relatively more muscle per unit body mass than goats (37 versus 26 %), but the maximal rate of oxidation per gram of muscle is still larger in the dog by a factor of 1.55...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1996) 199 (8): 1651–1658.
Published: 1 August 1996
... of symmorphosis, which states that structural capacities are quantitatively matched to functional demand. Only under rate-limiting conditions will all of the structural capacity be used. Dogs and goats were compared to obtain large differences in absolute rates. We exercised the animals for long enough to reach...