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Keywords: dog
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Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2017) 220 (10): 1864–1874.
Published: 15 May 2017
...Simon Wilshin; Michelle A. Reeve; G. Clark Haynes; Shai Revzen; Daniel E. Koditschek; Andrew J. Spence ABSTRACT Legged animals utilize gait selection to move effectively and must recover from environmental perturbations. We show that on rough terrain, domestic dogs, Canis lupus familiaris , spend...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2013) 216 (12): 2257–2265.
Published: 15 June 2013
... the footfall patterns of dogs when accelerating and decelerating from 1.5 m s −1 to more than 6 m s −1 and back. We obtained 383 transitions between all the symmetrical and asymmetrical gaits used by the dogs. Analysis of the interlimb coordination modifications and of each foot parameter showed that mechanics...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2009) 212 (7): 1053–1063.
Published: 1 April 2009
... of the m. multifidus lumborum and the m. longissimus thoracis et lumborum at three different sites along the trunk (T13, L3, L6) as we manipulated the moments acting on the trunk and the pelvis in dogs trotting on a treadmill. Confirming results of previous studies, both muscles exhibited a biphasic...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2008) 211 (24): 3836–3849.
Published: 15 December 2008
... to produce ever faster dogs, horses and humans. Quantification of the limits to running speed may aid in formulating and testing models of locomotion. Table A7. Correlation between population size and speed in women's races Distance (m) Plateau begins (population, billions) Probability 100...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2007) 210 (2): 208–216.
Published: 15 January 2007
... quadrupedal gait. Individual ground forces were recorded from each of the four limbs as six dogs galloped down a runway at constant speed. Trials were videotaped at high speed using a camera positioned perpendicular to the runway, and velocity was measured using photosensors. The trailing forelimb applied...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2004) 207 (10): 1715–1728.
Published: 15 April 2004
... this hypothesis by adding 10% body mass near the center of mass, at the pectoral girdle, or at the pelvic girdle of trotting dogs. Two force platforms in series recorded fore- and hindlimb ground reaction forces independently. Vertical and fore–aft impulses were calculated by integrating individual force–time...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2002) 205 (13): 1953–1967.
Published: 1 July 2002
... and ventilatory activity of the trunk muscles of trotting dogs under two conditions: when the ventilatory cycle and the locomotor cycle were coupled and when they were uncoupled. Patterns of muscle-activity entrainment with locomotor and ventilatory events revealed (i)that the internal and external abdominal...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2001) 204 (17): 3053–3064.
Published: 1 September 2001
... in locomotion. To address their locomotor function, we recorded the electrical activity of the iliocostalis, longissimus dorsi and multifidus muscles of trotting dogs. Activity was monitored at both lumbar and thoracic sites. To develop and evaluate hypotheses of epaxial muscle function, we quantified footfall...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1999) 202 (24): 3565–3573.
Published: 15 December 1999
...David V. Lee; John E. A. Bertram; Rory J. Todhunter ABSTRACT During quadrupedal trotting, diagonal pairs of limbs are set down in unison and exert forces on the ground simultaneously. Ground-reaction forces on individual limbs of trotting dogs were measured separately using a series of four force...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1999) 202 (20): 2859–2867.
Published: 15 October 1999
.... Domestication and selective breeding have resulted in a high variability in head size and shape in the dog ( Canis familiaris ), suggesting that there might be large differences in the vocal tract length, which could cause formant behaviour to affect interbreed communication. Lateral radiographs were made...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1998) 201 (23): 3185–3195.
Published: 1 December 1998
... in three domestic dogs during trotting and galloping. We used ground force recordings and kinematic analysis to calculate the changes in gear ratio that occur during the production of the external work of locomotion. We also monitored length changes of the vastus lateralis muscle, an extensor muscle...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1998) 201 (23): 3197–3210.
Published: 1 December 1998
... limb joints of running dogs to evaluate which muscle–tendon systems contribute to elastic storage and to determine the extent to which the external work of locomotion is produced by muscles that shorten actively rather than by muscles that function as springs. We found that the negative and positive...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1998) 201 (19): 2753–2762.
Published: 1 October 1998
... hypothesized that bipeds recruit a larger volume of muscle to support their weight, eliminating the potential economy of longer legs and slower steps. To test our hypothesis, we calculated the relative volume of muscle needed to support body weight over a stride in small dogs ( Canis familiaris ) and wild...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1996) 199 (8): 1667–1674.
Published: 1 August 1996
...Jean-Michel Weber; Gérard Brichon; Georges Zwingelstein; Grant Mcclelland; Christopher Saucedo; Ewald R. Weibel; C. Richard Taylor ABSTRACT This paper quantifies the fluxes of fatty acids through the pathways supplying muscle mitochondria with oxidative fuel in exercising dogs and goats. We used...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1996) 199 (8): 1659–1666.
Published: 1 August 1996
... % and 23 % of the carbohydrate oxidized at exercise intensities approaching in dogs and goats, respectively. Unexpectedly, maximal rates of circulating glucose oxidation were nearly the same in the two species (when expressed in absolute terms; dog:goat ratio = 1.2), despite the 2.2-fold difference...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1996) 199 (8): 1675–1688.
Published: 1 August 1996
... rates of oxygen and substrate transport measured in the same animals and reported in the preceding papers of this series. Dogs have relatively more muscle per unit body mass than goats (37 versus 26 %), but the maximal rate of oxidation per gram of muscle is still larger in the dog by a factor of 1.55...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1996) 199 (8): 1651–1658.
Published: 1 August 1996
... of symmorphosis, which states that structural capacities are quantitatively matched to functional demand. Only under rate-limiting conditions will all of the structural capacity be used. Dogs and goats were compared to obtain large differences in absolute rates. We exercised the animals for long enough to reach...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1994) 188 (1): 217–233.
Published: 1 March 1994
... of the quadriceps and hamstrings and strain on the distal tibia were monitored simultaneously. Ground reaction forces on the dog hindlimbs were measured before and after strain gauges had been applied to the tibia. The data show a significant shift to lower median myoelectrical frequencies in the quadriceps...