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Keywords: camouflage
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Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2019) 222 (24): jeb213306.
Published: 12 December 2019
... be appealing to predators and therefore constitute an evolutionary disadvantage. Animals often employ absorption and scattering in order to reduce the directionality of the reflected light and thereby enhance their camouflage. Here, we investigated the monkey beetle Hoplia argentea using microspectrophotometry...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2017) 220 (22): 4225–4233.
Published: 15 November 2017
...Laura E. Bagge; Stephen T. Kinsey; Justin Gladman; Sönke Johnsen ABSTRACT Whole-body transparency, an effective camouflage strategy in many aquatic species, can be disrupted by environmental and/or physiological stressors. We found that tail-flip escape responses temporarily disrupt...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2017) 220 (6): 1048–1055.
Published: 15 March 2017
...Viviana Cadena; Kathleen R. Smith; John A. Endler; Devi Stuart-Fox ABSTRACT Animals may improve camouflage by both dynamic colour change and local evolutionary adaptation of colour but we have little understanding of their relative importance in colour-changing species. We tested for differences...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2014) 217 (18): 3263–3273.
Published: 15 September 2014
... are most strongly reflected in stomatopod larval eyeshine, suggesting a putative spectral matching to the light environment against which the larval eyes are viewed. We tested the efficacy of stomatopod crustacean larval eyeshine as an ocular camouflaging mechanism by photographing larvae in their natural...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2013) 216 (14): 2760–2767.
Published: 15 July 2013
... morphological colour change phenotypic plasticity camouflage background matching Animals such as reptiles, amphibians, fish and cephalopods can change their body colour for functions such as photoprotection, thermoregulation, social signalling and predator avoidance (reviewed in Sugimoto, 2002...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (20): 3423–3432.
Published: 15 October 2011
... chromatophores do not grow at all after they are inserted in the dermis. Sepia officinalis cephalopod body patterning camouflage chromatophore cuttlefish Camouflage plays a key role in the lives of many animals both as a method of defense enabling prey to hide from predators and as a hunting...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (5): 709–716.
Published: 1 March 2011
...Ashwin Bhandiwad; Sönke Johnsen SUMMARY Transparency is an effective form of camouflage, but it must be present throughout the entire volume of an animal to succeed. Certain environmental stressors may cause physiological responses that increase internal light scattering, making tissue less...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2009) 212 (14): 2133–2140.
Published: 15 July 2009
...Lydia M. Mäthger; Nadav Shashar; Roger T. Hanlon SUMMARY Cephalopods (squid, cuttlefish and octopus) are probably best known for their ability to change color and pattern for camouflage and communication. This is made possible by their complex skin, which contains pigmented chromatophore organs...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2009) 212 (12): 1832–1839.
Published: 15 June 2009
...Eunice J. Tan; Daiqin Li SUMMARY Many species of the orb-web spider genus Cyclosa often adorn their webs with decorations of prey remains, egg sacs and/or plant detritus, termed`detritus decorations'. These detritus decorations have been hypothesised to camouflage the spider from predators or prey...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2008) 211 (11): 1757–1763.
Published: 1 June 2008
...Emma J. Kelman; Daniel Osorio; Roland J. Baddeley SUMMARY Cuttlefishes of the genus Sepia produce adaptive camouflage by regulating the expression of visual features such as spots and lines, and textures including stipples and stripes. They produce the appropriate pattern for a given environment...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2007) 210 (15): 2657–2666.
Published: 1 August 2007
...Lydia M. Mäthger; Chuan-Chin Chiao; Alexandra Barbosa; Kendra C. Buresch; Sarrah Kaye; Roger T. Hanlon SUMMARY Cephalopods are known for their ability to change camouflage body patterns in response to changes in the visual background. Recent research has used artificial substrates...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2007) 210 (7): 1139–1147.
Published: 1 April 2007
...Alexandra Barbosa; Lydia M. Mäthger; Charles Chubb; Christopher Florio; Chuan-Chin Chiao; Roger T. Hanlon Among the changeable camouflage patterns of cuttlefish, disruptive patterning is shown in response to certain features of light objects in the visual background. However, whether animals show...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2006) 209 (19): 3697–3707.
Published: 1 October 2006
... by A. aculeatus and other octopuses are discussed. e-mail: chuffard@berkeley.edu 10 7 2006 © The Company of Biologists Limited 2006 2006 hydrostatic multi-legged bipedal camouflage velocity mimicry Unlike other examples of multi-limbed hydrostats such as caterpillars( Mezoff...
Includes: Multimedia, Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2006) 209 (17): 3288–3292.
Published: 1 September 2006
...Emma J. Kelman; Palap Tiptus; Daniel Osorio SUMMARY Plaice ( Pleuronectes platessa ) is a flatfish well-known for the ability to vary its body pattern, probably for camouflage. This study investigates the repertoire of patterns used by juvenile plaice, by describing how they respond to shifts...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2005) 208 (22): 4199–4202.
Published: 15 November 2005
... for correspondence (e-mail: reneer@nioz.nl ) 6 9 2005 © The Company of Biologists Limited 2005 2005 uropygial gland preen wax camouflage olfaction nest predation sandpiper Calidris canutus The application of secretions of the uropygial gland, also called preen waxes...
Includes: Multimedia, Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2001) 204 (12): 2119–2125.
Published: 15 June 2001
... of disruptive skin patterns in young cuttlefish. Movies available on-line ‡e-mail: rhanlon@mbl.edu 29 3 2001 © The Company of Biologists Limited 2001 2001 camouflage visual perception sensory colour patterns disruptive coloration cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis. Cephalopod...
Includes: Multimedia, Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1991) 156 (1): 119–137.
Published: 1 March 1991
... © 1991 by Company of Biologists 1991 bioluminescence leiognathid counterillumination camouflage antipredation /. exp. Biol. 156, 119-137 (1991) 119 Printed in Great Britain © The Company of Biologists Limited 1991 CAMOUFLAGE BY DISRUPTIVE ILLUMINATION IN LEIOGNATHIDS, A FAMILY...