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Keywords: Echolocation
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Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2022) 225 (9): jeb243728.
Published: 12 May 2022
... strategist Blainville's beaked whale, Sowerby's beaked whale lives in the fast lane. While targeting a similar mesopelagic/bathypelagic foraging zone, they consistently swim and hunt faster, perform shorter deep dives, and echolocate at a faster rate with higher frequency clicks. Further, extensive near...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2022) 225 (7): jeb243402.
Published: 4 April 2022
...Yuuka Mizuguchi; Emyo Fujioka; Olga Heim; Dai Fukui; Shizuko Hiryu ABSTRACT Bats emit a series of echolocation calls with an increasing repetition rate (the terminal buzz) when attempting to capture prey. This is often used as an acoustic indicator of prey-capture attempts. However, because...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2022) 225 (3): jeb242957.
Published: 10 February 2022
...Ilias Foskolos; Michael Bjerre Pedersen; Kristian Beedholm; Astrid Særmark Uebel; Jamie Macaulay; Laura Stidsholt; Signe Brinkløv; Peter Teglberg Madsen ABSTRACT Echolocating bats hunt prey on the wing under conditions of poor lighting by emission of loud calls and subsequent auditory processing...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2021) 224 (22): jeb242637.
Published: 9 November 2021
...Te K. Jones; Kathryne M. Allen; Cynthia F. Moss ABSTRACT Animals that rely on electrolocation and echolocation for navigation and prey detection benefit from sensory systems that can operate in the dark, allowing them to exploit sensory niches with few competitors. Active sensing has been...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2021) 224 (16): jeb242779.
Published: 13 August 2021
...Chloe E. Malinka; Laia Rojano-Doñate; Peter T. Madsen ABSTRACT Echolocating toothed whales face the problem that high sound speeds in water mean that echoes from closely spaced targets will arrive at time delays within their reported auditory integration time of some 264 µs. Here, we test...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2021) 224 (9): jeb241968.
Published: 4 May 2021
..., particularly in laryngeal echolocating bats. A first step requires the characterization of behavioral responses to different combinations of sensory cues. Here, we quantified the behavioral responses of the insectivorous big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus , in an obstacle avoidance task offering different...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2021) 224 (6): jeb234245.
Published: 18 March 2021
...M. Jerome Beetz; Manfred Kössl; Julio C. Hechavarría ABSTRACT Animals extract behaviorally relevant signals from ‘noisy’ environments. Echolocation behavior provides a rich system testbed for investigating signal extraction. When echolocating in acoustically enriched environments, bats show many...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
In collection:
Neuroethology
J Exp Biol (2020) 223 (20): jeb224311.
Published: 16 October 2020
...Peter A. Wagenhäuser; Lutz Wiegrebe; A. Leonie Baier ABSTRACT Many echolocating bats forage close to vegetation – a chaotic arrangement of prey and foliage where multiple targets are positioned behind one another. Bats excel at determining distance: they measure the delay between the outgoing call...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
In collection:
Neuroethology
J Exp Biol (2020) 223 (19): jeb225284.
Published: 9 October 2020
... with interfering noise. In humans, the Lombard effect influences the lexical stress through differential amplitude modulation at a sub-call syllable level, which so far has not been documented in animals. Here, we bridge this knowledge gap with two species of Hipposideros bats, which produce echolocation calls...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2020) 223 (17): jeb226316.
Published: 1 September 2020
... in the production of their rich vocal repertoires. Here, using suction cup hydrophones on the head of a trained beluga whale, we measured seven different communication signal types and echolocation clicks in order to test the hypothesis that belugas produce distinct sounds unilaterally. We show that, like other...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2020) 223 (12): jeb223909.
Published: 26 June 2020
...Mads Nedergaard Olsen; Annemarie Surlykke; Lasse Jakobsen ABSTRACT All animals are adapted to their ecology within the bounds of their evolutionary heritage. Echolocating bats clearly show such adaptations and boundaries through their biosonar call design. Adaptations include not only the overall...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2020) 223 (3): jeb216283.
Published: 3 February 2020
... multi-target echolocation and single-target tracking. The pre-transition AOL adjustment was computed from the first click in a 10 s window before the end of a buzz until the click defining the start of AOL adjustment. The transition AOL adjustment was computed from the click defining the start of AOL...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2019) 222 (16): jeb206169.
Published: 19 August 2019
...Michael Ladegaard; Peter Teglberg Madsen ABSTRACT Echolocating mammals generally target individual prey items by transitioning through the biosonar phases of search (slow-rate, high-amplitude outputs), approach (gradually increasing rate and decreasing output amplitude) and buzzing (high-rate, low...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2019) 222 (6): jeb195404.
Published: 21 March 2019
...Kathrin Kugler; Harald Luksch; Herbert Peremans; Dieter Vanderelst; Lutz Wiegrebe; Uwe Firzlaff ABSTRACT Echolocating bats are known to fly and forage in complete darkness, using the echoes of their actively emitted calls to navigate and to detect prey. However, under dim light conditions many bats...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2019) 222 (3): jeb192005.
Published: 1 February 2019
... and foraging for bats that need echolocation to both navigate and detect prey, and can result in higher flight costs due to increased metabolic rates. Using playback experiments at natural roosts, we tested whether two bat species, differing in their hunting strategies and foraging habitats, use rain noise...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
In collection:
Neuroethology
J Exp Biol (2018) 221 (24): jeb191155.
Published: 10 December 2018
...Michaela Warnecke; Silvio Macías; Benjamin Falk; Cynthia F. Moss ABSTRACT To navigate in the natural environment, animals must adapt their locomotion in response to environmental stimuli. The echolocating bat relies on auditory processing of echo returns to represent its surroundings. Recent...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2018) 221 (11): jeb166033.
Published: 12 June 2018
... suite of morphological and physiological adaptations that were required for a fully aquatic mammalian life history. Two specific functional innovations that characterize the two great clades of cetaceans, echolocation in toothed whales (Odontoceti) and filter feeding in baleen whales (Mysticeti...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2017) 220 (14): 2654–2665.
Published: 15 July 2017
...Michael Ladegaard; Frants Havmand Jensen; Kristian Beedholm; Vera Maria Ferreira da Silva; Peter Teglberg Madsen ABSTRACT Toothed whales have evolved to live in extremely different habitats and yet they all rely strongly on echolocation for finding and catching prey. Such biosonar-based foraging...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2017) 220 (6): 1032–1037.
Published: 15 March 2017
... communication Audio-vocal integration Echolocation Environmental noise Signal plasticity Auditory feedback is widely used among birds and mammals for fine-tuning the spectro-temporal features and to guide the adjustments of the loudness of their vocalizations ( Lombard, 1911 ; Brumm and Zollinger...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2016) 219 (12): 1793–1797.
Published: 15 June 2016
... flow, but rely mostly on echolocation. Here, we show that bats exploit echo-acoustic flow to negotiate flight through narrow passages. Specifically, bats' flight between lateral structures is significantly affected by the echo-acoustic salience of those structures, independent of their physical...