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Keywords: Translational repression
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Journal Articles
In collection:
Plant development
Journal: Development
Development (2020) 147 (8): dev186874.
Published: 27 April 2020
... no significant effect on SPL transcript levels, or on the level or the activity of miR156. Although AMP1 has been reported to promote miRNA-mediated translational repression, amp1 did not prevent the translational repression of the miR156 target SPL9 or the miR159 target MYB33. These results suggest that AMP1...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
In collection:
Reproductive biology
Journal: Development
Development (2018) 145 (19): dev166587.
Published: 2 October 2018
... embryos. Supplementing translational repression by eIF4E inhibition markedly rescues the M ybx1 phenotype. Mechanistically, Ybx1 in embryos may associate with processing body components and repress translation when tethered to target mRNAs. Collectively, our results identify maternal Ybx1 as a global...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Journal: Development
Development (2012) 139 (8): 1476–1486.
Published: 15 April 2012
... less stable than VegT in Nanos1-depleted PGCs. Our data indicate that maternal VegT RNA is an authentic target of Nanos1/Pumilio translational repression. We propose that Nanos1 functions to translationally repress RNAs that normally specify endoderm and promote apoptosis, thus preserving the germline...
Journal Articles
Journal: Development
Development (2011) 138 (3): 589–598.
Published: 1 February 2011
... unlocalized RNA results in abnormal development, highlighting the importance of TCE-mediated translational repression. Although found in prokaryotes, steric hindrance as a mechanism for negatively regulating translation is novel for a eukaryotic RNA. These observations unravel a new mode of nanos1 regulation...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Journal: Development
Development (2010) 137 (20): 3373–3382.
Published: 15 October 2010
...-2 from the zif-1 3′ UTR, releasing translational repression. We propose that MBK-2 phosphorylation serves as a developmental switch, converting OMA proteins from specific translational repressors in oocytes to global transcriptional repressors in embryos, together effectively repressing...
Includes: Supplementary data